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Remember, there are no mistakes, only lessons. Love yourself, trust your choices, and everything is possible.
Cherie Carter–Scott (via itsquoted)
We do not grow absolutely, chronologically. We grow sometimes in one dimension, and not in another, unevenly. We grow partially. We are relative. We are mature in one realm, childish in another. The past, present, and future mingle and pull us backward, forward or fix us in the present. We are made of layers, cells, constellations.
Anaïs Nin (via itsquoted)
Just as gymnastic exercise is necessary to keep the body healthy, so is musical exercise necessary to keep the soul healthy; the proper nourishment of the intellect and passions can no more take place without music than the proper functions of the stomach and the blood without exercise.
Plato (via itsquoted)
Don’t be afraid to play the piccolo. The only time it sounds bad is when you’re afraid.
Professor Richard Clary (via fuckyeahmusicnerds)
The job of a mixer is to find the pure essence of a song and take it to a new level. You ask yourself how a song makes you feel, and why it makes you feel that way. And with every change you make you wonder: does it make me feel better, or not? It’s not about the equipment, but about what you do with it. We all use the same tools. Instead your job is to find an emotional connection with the song, and trust your own feelings. When you do, other people will get it too
Manny Marroquin (via sosound)
Where words fail, music speaks.
Hans Christian Anderson (via itsquoted)

Let’s get to recording.

nprfreshair:

Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews Magic 201, the last album from jazz flutist and saxophonist Frank Wess before he passed away last year:

"Nowadays we have ample evidence that playing jazz keeps the mind and body nimble, given all the musicians in their ’80s and up who still sound good. But we are running out of saxophonists whose styles were formed before John Coltrane’s harder sound took over. There is something tender and specific about the ways elders like Frank Wess shaped their notes that’s hard for younger musicians to evoke without anachronisms creeping in. That’s one reason music lovers love their records: even after the masters are gone, their sound is right here with us."

nprfreshair:

Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews Magic 201, the last album from jazz flutist and saxophonist Frank Wess before he passed away last year:

"Nowadays we have ample evidence that playing jazz keeps the mind and body nimble, given all the musicians in their ’80s and up who still sound good. But we are running out of saxophonists whose styles were formed before John Coltrane’s harder sound took over. There is something tender and specific about the ways elders like Frank Wess shaped their notes that’s hard for younger musicians to evoke without anachronisms creeping in. That’s one reason music lovers love their records: even after the masters are gone, their sound is right here with us."